The Marquee

Column: Boys will be boys

Column: Boys will be boys

Madi Olivier

March 14, 2020

In elementary school, some boys shoved girls and pulled their hair. Teachers would try to discipline them, but it often ended in giving a defeated shrug and muttering the same four words. “Boys will be boys.” In middle school, some boys would whistle at girls in the hallway and engage in “locker room ta...

Column: I’ll love you forever

Column: I’ll love you forever

Tara Connick

March 13, 2020

I’ll love you forever. I’ll like you for always. As long as I’m living my baby you’ll be. Moms teared up as my preschool class recited the words to the popular children’s book “Love You Forever” during our Mother’s Day celebration. My mom smiled at me while she wiped her eyes. Even though a dozen kids were...

Column: The b-word

Column: The b-word

McKenna Cowley

March 12, 2020

I wandered through beige hallways that never seemed to end, checking my watch and seeing the time run out. I was desperate and lost, entering a random classroom for help. Faceless strangers stared at me, waiting for me to speak. Then the late bell rang. I looked down at my outfit, except I didn’t have one. I...

Remarks: Cosmetic surgery

Remarks: Cosmetic surgery

Ayra Charania

March 11, 2020

The Marquee: What are your thoughts on cosmetic surgery?

Remarks: “The Bachelor”

Remarks: “The Bachelor”

Shriya Mukkavilli

March 10, 2020

The Marquee: Who are you rooting for on “The Bachelor”?

Remarks: American Dream

Remarks: American Dream

Samantha Thornfelt

March 7, 2020

The Marquee: Does the original American Dream seem achievable to you? Why or why not?

Remarks: students voting

Remarks: students voting

Nikhita Ragam and Reya Mosby

March 6, 2020

The Marquee: Do you think it is important for students to become politically aware and exercise their right to vote?

Column: Being a person of color is not a crime

Column: Being a person of color is not a crime

Reya Mosby

February 21, 2020

Red and blue lights and the words “BREAKING NEWS” appeared on the TV. My dad’s eyes were glued to the screen as it displayed a picture of a young black boy.    He was shot and killed by a police officer because he looked “dangerous.” I sat with my knees pulled to my chest staring ahead at the TV trying to make sense of what was happening. Police officers are ...

Marcus High School's Online Newspaper
Opinion